Rock’n’roll Travel with England Rocks: A Map to Explore England’s Rock Music

photo-diapo-england01Never mind weekends away at luxury hotels or mountain biking, why not follow in the footsteps of your favourite rock musicians in England? The UK tourist board has just published England Rocks, a map cataloguing over 100 places linked to the history of rock in this country. From the Arctic Monkeys to The Zutons via The Beatles, The Clash or Jimi Hendrix, follow in the footsteps of your idols over a rock’n’roll weekend. Take London, for example.

Launched in partnership with British record company EMI and the city of Liverpool, European Capital of Culture 2008 and birthplace of The Beatles, England Rocks lists over one hundred landmarks of English rock and roll in the form of a CD-size folding map. You can order it directly on www.england-rocks.co.uk. While you wait for the post, you can indulge in a little interactive exploration of the wealth of rock-and-roll heritage, spread over the nine regions of England. The advantage over the paper version is that the Internet map has links to tourist resources that enable you to plan your trip.
All the same, we have to admit that it’s best if you are already a true-blue fan: there’s actually not much to see most of the time, just evocative places, streets, clubs and concert halls. Here you learn, notably, that the sleeve of the Oasis single Some Might Say depicts Cromford station in Derbyshire; that Pulp and the Arctic Monkeys started out in Sheffield’s Leadmill Club; that it was in the Priority Roads cemetery (south west England) that Brian Jones (Rolling Stones) was laid to rest, after drowning in his swimming pool.
Only London, which remains one of the most exciting cities in the world, will give you a real rock-and-roll weekend, with highlights that could include the following:
Hard Rock Café
On display here are some cult objects from the history of rock and roll, including the knitted black shawl worn by Janis Joplin in concert, which featured on the back of the 1967 Cheap Thrills album, as well as Eric Clapton’s Fender Lead II guitar. The Hard Rock Café is also the starting point of the Big Bus Tour that will enable you to discover London.
Kings Road
Renamed “Sex” in the 1970s, Malcolm McLaren and Vivienne Westwood’s shop was the cradle of the British punk movement and aesthetic. The Sex Pistols, a band of spotty, glue-sniffing brats, were originally formed mainly to promote the shop. True brand-shopping heaven, the Kings Road is now a major tourist attraction in London.
Denmark Street (Tin Pan Alley)
The Beatles, Rolling Stones and Kinks all frequented this district, famous for its music shops and studios, in the 1960s. It was here that The Sex Pistols, who lived at number 6 Denmark Street in the mid-1970s, bawled out their greatest punk anthems, including Anarchy in the UK and God Save the Queen.
Hammersmith Palais
Who has not heard of this legendary temple of Anglo-Saxon music, immortalised by The Clash in 1978 in White Man in Hammersmith Palais, a track celebrating the fusion of punk music and reggae. The Sex Pistols, Police, U2 and Oasis have played here. The district, on the other hand, is depressing.
Koko
Called in turn the Music Machine, then Camden Palace, this club witnessed the debuts of The Police, Siouxsie and the Banshees and, more recently, Madonna, Coldplay and Babyshambles, Pete Doherty’s band.
Proud Galleries
This gallery, along with another one in Chalk Farm Road (Camden), regularly organises exhibitions of photos devoted to rock legends, from Jimi Hendrix to Keith Richards via Freddie Mercury, The Beatles and The Libertines.
Abbey Road Studios
One of London’s rock’n’roll landmarks. In August 1969, The Beatles left the Abbey Road Studios in St John’s Wood for a 10-minute photo session… All the fans now walk across the famous zebra crossing for a souvenir photo.
23 Brook Street
Jimi Hendrix lived at this address in the 1960s. By an irony of fate, number 25 Brook Street houses the Handel museum. This museum recounts the life and work of the composer, in a magnificently restored Georgian interior.
www.handelhouse.org
Hammersmith Apollo
Formerly the Hammersmith Odeon, this large venue still hosts major artistes. It was here that David Bowie famously killed off his alter ego, Ziggy Stardust, at the end of his UK tour in 1973.
23 Heddon Street
This is where the photo for the cover of David Bowie’s album The Rise and Fall of Ziggy Stardust & the Spiders from Mars was taken in 1972. Don’t miss nearby Carnaby Street: it was the epicentre of 1960s fashion and Swinging London. The street notably inspired The Kinks (“Dedicated Follower of Fashion”) and The Jam (“Carnaby Street”). A recent facelift has transformed it into a centre of fashion worthy of the third millennium!
PRACTICAL INFORMATION
Never mind weekends away at luxury hotels or mountain biking, why not follow in the footsteps of your favourite rock musicians in England? The UK tourist board has just published England Rocks, a map cataloguing over 100 places linked to the history of rock in this country. From the Arctic Monkeys to The Zutons via The Beatles, The Clash or Jimi Hendrix, follow in the footsteps of your idols over a rock’n’roll weekend. Take London, for example.
Source: http://www.youtube, Sting, Josh Groban, Chriss Botti,

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s